Workers in 16 different professions will soon be able to ask the Nova Scotia government to nominate them for permanent resident status.

The Nova Scotia Demand program will re-open in May with new rules and a new list of jobs that qualify you to apply. You don’t need a Nova Scotia degree or Nova Scotia work experience to be eligible for this program.  Nova Scotia will nominate 250 people under the program, and then pause it again. You must have at least one year of work experience in one of the following occupations to be able to apply:

  • Financial auditors and accountants (NOC 1111)
  • Other financial officers (NOC 1114)
  • Professional occupations in advertising, marketing and public relations (NOC 1123)
  • Administrative assistants (NOC 1241)
  • Accounting and related clerks (NOC 1311)
  • Civil engineers (NOC 2131)
  • Information systems analysts and consultants (NOC 2171)
  • Computer programmers and interactive media development (NOC 2174)
  • Computer network technicians (NOC2281)
  • User support technicians (NOC 2282)
  • Registered nurses and registered psychiatric nurses (NOC 3012)
  • Licensed practical nurses (NOC 3233)
  • College and other vocational instructors (NOC 4021)
  • Paralegal and related occupations (NOC 4211)
  • Social and community service workers (NOC 4212)
  • Financial sales representatives (NOC 6235)

NOC refers to National Occupational Classification. You can find more information about NOC codes and how they work on the studentimmigration.ca NOC page. You can find more detailed information about the Demand program on the studentimmigration.ca Nova Scotia Demand program page.

If you are interested in applying for permanent resident status through Nova Scotia Demand, it would be wise to start preparing your application now. It is likely that the program will only accept applications for a short time before reaching its quota of 250.

If you want to find an immigration lawyer or regulated immigration consultant to help you with the application, you can search our directory for legal professionals across Canada who speak different languages.

Share This